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Farmers Market Season Begins for Mahoning and Trumbull Counties - WKBN


Over the past couple of years, the Valley has lost a lot of its grocery stores, leaving many people without a place to get food. But, farmers markets are a great way to increase food access to those here in the Valley and to fuel the local economy.Starting today, both the Warren and Idora Neighborhood farmers markets kick off. The Warren Farmers Market runs from 3-6 p.m. and the Idora Neighborhood Farmers Market runs from 4:30-7 p.m. Both markets will be going on every Tuesday for the rest of the season. “It’s a huge resource for all the members of the neighborhood and the community,” said Anthony Florig, Idora Neighborhood Farmers Market. The Idora Neighborhood Farmers Market is located at 2600 Glenwood Avenue in Youngstown and the Warren Farmers Market is on Courthouse Square in Warren. Both spots do not have nearby grocery stores. “Grocery stores are of course an important resource — we all use them. But, a farmers market shaves so many miles off the food distribution channels,” said Matt Martin, Warren Farmers Market. These farmers markets offer fruits and vegetables grown right here in the Valley, like apples, tomatoes and cucumbers. “We want to promote a local food economy and basically make sure everyone has access to fresh fruits and vegetables that we have,” Martin said. Both markets accept food assistance cards and you can double your money. “I can swipe your Snap card for $30 and you get $60 to spend at the market,” Florig said. Transportation can be a big problem for those who don’t live near the markets. So, to help create more access in Warren, Martin says the Warren Farmers Market offers free transportation to and from the market for anyone living in Warren. “We [want to] expand the market to include everyone in our city that has limited access to fresh local food. That’s why we have the double your dollars, the free transportation,” Martin said. To get a free ride to the Warren Farmers Market, all you have to do is call or text 330-599-9275.

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